Difference between revisions of "Rough consensus and running code"

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[[Category: Design Principles]]
 
[[Category: Design Principles]]
Rough consensus and running code means that we should design practical, working systems that can be quickly implemented and solve a problem the a group agrees they have.
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'''Rough consensus and running code''' means that we should design practical, working systems that can be quickly implemented and solve a problem the a group agrees they have.
  
 
For example, If everyone agrees we need images on the web, and someone gets images up and running, whoever gets there first will probably be the one setting the direction for the structure.
 
For example, If everyone agrees we need images on the web, and someone gets images up and running, whoever gets there first will probably be the one setting the direction for the structure.
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The concept was forged during the internet standards wars. “We reject: kings, presidents, and voting. We believe in: rough consensus and running code,” was coined by David Clark in 1992.
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==Additional Resources==
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* [http://www.davidellis.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Russell-running-code.pdf ‘Rough Consensus and Running Code’
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and the Internet-OSI Standards War] (PDF)
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* [https://medium.com/@shesek/rough-consensus-and-running-code-and-the-internet-osi-standards-war-3eb2fbecc484 An excerpt of the above, on Medium]

Revision as of 14:03, 27 September 2019

Rough consensus and running code means that we should design practical, working systems that can be quickly implemented and solve a problem the a group agrees they have.

For example, If everyone agrees we need images on the web, and someone gets images up and running, whoever gets there first will probably be the one setting the direction for the structure.

The concept was forged during the internet standards wars. “We reject: kings, presidents, and voting. We believe in: rough consensus and running code,” was coined by David Clark in 1992.

Additional Resources

and the Internet-OSI Standards War] (PDF)